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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
airborne division which is located along the afghanistan border with pakistan. then a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign with a focus on the grounds an early primary states as well as the republican presidential field. >> today, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non violence. they spoke to more than 10,000 people at the university of arkansas discussing osama bin laden's death, the nuremberg trials, the execution of saddam hussein, and the death penalty. >> in the 20th-century, the number of people were killed and three violence, over 200 million. that problem must be solved. there is also exploitation and we should lay down the seat of hatred course watched this discussion this evening at 6:30 on c-span. what's it look back at president nixon's foreign-policy. members of his administration and his son-in-law discussed topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam and the war in the middle east. >> the discussion in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day camp
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
it comes to al-qaeda, core leadership in pakistan, we have made the kind of strides that we need to make to be in a position of thinking we can win. speaking of vang wishing shadowy enemies. >> isn't that the metaphor for what we are talking about. terror is a shadow and we are a big, adorable dog chasing a shadow? that made no sense at all. moynihan, time for a parade? >> really? time for a parade? like we defeated al-qaeda parade with blimps and balloons and things? you have actually a bad track record with things. >> it is not over you think? >> i don't know. i was going to say something bad about the cia, but he is right there. >> i just don't put a lot of stock in them. >> thanks for turning off your phone. >> calling the cia. >> what is the evidence of this beyond the bin laden killing. i was going to make some jokes, but i feel bad talking about al-qaeda. >> do you still worry about terror attacks? i do and i always will. >> absolutely. we cutoff the head of the snake. and i think it is a great symbolic blow, but we all know we are not out of the water yet. al-qaeda is not one gro
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
. outpost caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, then every few days, this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic. they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are getting attacked from all sides. >> come on, hustle up. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming fortal ban talibae hills. but the incoming fire is very accurate here. >> go, go, go! >> reporter: they arrange cover from heavy machine guns. but the bullets are too close. locals scatter. just before huge american fire power has the last word. four massive air strikes across the hills and then the taliban fall silent. america knew why it came here, but isn't sure why it's staying. >> can we get like a police call for like cigarette butts? >> absolutely. >> reporter: ten minutes later, jets swoop into strafe the hills. a show of force for the taliban are now either gone or dead, at least five killed by the soldiers count. the next morning, it
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)